Celebrating International Youth Day 2016

The International Youth Day is celebrated on August 12 annually. The theme for this year is “The Road to 2030: Eradicating Poverty and Achieving Sustainable Consumption and Production.” The theme focuses specifically on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (Goal 12). According to un.org, sustainable consumption and production is about promoting resource and energy efficiency, sustainable infrastructure, and providing access to basic services, green and decent jobs and a better quality of life for all. Its implementation helps to achieve overall development plans, reduce future economic, environmental and social costs, strengthen economic competitiveness and reduce poverty.

With a population of over 1.8 billion youth, the world has never been this young. Youth are powerful agents of positive change, essential to taking forward the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.“

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“I invite governments, foundations, civil society organizations, and the youth movement to mark the day by highlighting the positive contributions of youth in development and by pledging to engage with youth as partners in the implementation of the SDGs,” said the UN Envoy on Youth Ahmad Alhendawi ahead of the event.

Happy International Youth Day 2016!

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Celebrating the International Literacy Day

As the world all over celebrate today as the International Literacy Day, it is important to know that some 775 million adults lack minimum literacy skills; one in five adults is still not literate and two-thirds of them are women; 60.7 million children are out-of-school and many more attend irregularly or drop out.

Literacy is the key driver for sustainable development. Literacy skills are the prerequisite for the learning of a broader set of knowledge, skills, attitude and value, required for creating sustainable societies.

September 8 was first proclaimed International Literacy Day by UNESCO on November 17, 1965 and was first celebrated in 1966. Its aim is to highlight the importance of literacy to individuals, communities, and societies.

From the data collected in the UNESCO’s “Global Monitoring Report on Education for All”, sub-Saharan-Africa stood at second from the bottom on the list of regions with the lowest adult literacy rate with an average 59.7%; while West-Asia stood as the region with the lowest adult literacy rate with an average of 58.6%.

The level of literacy of a region determines to a larger extent the rate of development of that society. For Africa to rise from the bottom of the development chain, we need to put more effort in education: adult education, girl child education, health education and global education. If we must succeed and be recognized in the world, then we must embrace education and literacy.

If we would conquer terrorism, poverty, hunger and disease and mismanagement of resources, then we need to a high literacy level among citizens of African countries.