Write for Africa Essay Competition 2017

Radiant Initiative for Africa Essay Contest, “Write for Africa” aims at creating awareness on the career opportunities available to young, talented writers, to find creative writers and place them on internships in organizations where their writing prowess will be harnessesed, nurtured and prepared for higher opportunities. All entrants are expected to tell their own stories, motivate others and to show the world who they really are through their submissions.

The topic for the essay is My Life, My Words (Non Fiction).

What to gain

  • The top three prize winners will be given an Amazon Kindle, Color Printer and writing pak respectively
  • Three winners will be selected to participate in a 6 months paid internship;
  • Winners will be put in contact with with influential writers who will serve as mentors to them, providing wider exposure for their creative work, providing them access to national and international support networks of fellow young writers and change makers.

Who can apply?

  • Young Nigerians between the ages of 18 and 29;
  • Candidates willing to travel to Abuja if selected for the face-to-face interview and be willing to take the 6 months paid internship placement.

How to apply

  • After completing the online registration, send essay to radiant4africa@gmail.com. Essays must not exceed 1000 words and the font type should be Times New Roman (size 14).
  • Submissions must be received by midnight of July 20, 2017. The shortlisted essays will be notified on July 30, 2017.

See more here.

Malawi: The Warm Heart of Africa

Malawi is a southeastern African country which is defined by its topography of highlands split by the Great Rift Valley and enormous Lake Malawi. It is a landlocked country bordered by Zambia to the northwest, Tanzania to the northeast, and Mozambique on the east, south and west. Malawi is over 118,000 km 2 (45,560 sq mi) with an estimated population of 16,777,547 (July 2013 est.). Its capital is Lilongwe, which is also Malawi’s largest city; the second largest is Blantyre , the third is Mzuzu and the fourth largest is its old capital Zomba. The name Malawi comes from the Maravi, an old name of the Nyanja people that inhabit the area. The country is also nicknamed “The Warm Heart of Africa”.

Malawi gained independence from the United Kingdom on July 6, 1964. English language as its official language of Malawi and Chichewa is the recognised national language.
Malawi is among the smallest countries in Africa. Lake Malawi takes about a third of Malawi’s area. The area of Africa now known as Malawi was settled by migrating Bantu groups around the 10th century. Centuries later in 1891 the area was colonised by the British. In 1953 Malawi, then known as Nyasaland, a protectorate of the United Kingdom, became a protectorate within the semi-independent Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. The Federation was dissolved in 1963. In 1964 the protectorate over Nyasaland was ended and Nyasaland became an independent country under Queen Elizabeth II with the new name Malawi. Two years later it became a republic. Upon gaining independence it became a one-party state under the presidency of Hastings Banda , who remained president until 1994, when he lost an election. Arthur Peter Mutharika is the current president. Malawi has a democratic, multi-party government.

Malawi is among the world’s least-developed countries. The economy is heavily based in agriculture, with a largely rural population. The Malawian government depends heavily on outside aid to meet development needs, although this need (and the aid offered) has decreased since 2000. The Malawian government faces challenges in building and expanding the economy, improving education, healthcare, environmental protection , and becoming financially independent. Since 2005, Malawi has developed several programs that focus on these issues, and the country’s outlook appears to be improving, with a rise in the economy, education and healthcare seen in 2007 and 2008.

Malawi has a low life expectancy and high infant mortality . There is a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS , which is a drain on the labour force and government expenditures. There is a diverse population of native peoples, Asians and Europeans, with several languages spoken and an array of religious beliefs. Although there was periodic regional conflict fuelled in part by ethnic divisions in the past, by 2008 it had diminished considerably and the concept of a Malawian nationality had re-emerged.

Malawi has two sites listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Lake Malawi National Park was first listed in 1984 and the Chongoni Rock Art Area was listed in 2006. Malawi’s climate is hot in the low-lying areas in the south of the country and temperate in the northern highlands. The altitude moderates what would otherwise be an equatorial climate. Between November and April the temperature is warm with equatorial rains and thunderstorms, with the storms reaching their peak severity in late March. After March, the rainfall rapidly diminishes and from May to September wet mists float from the highlands into the plateaus, with almost no rainfall.

Animal life indigenous to Malawi includes mammals such as elephants, hippos, big cats, monkeys, lemurs and bats; a great variety of birds including birds of prey, parrots and falcons, waterfowl and large waders, owls and songbirds. Lake Malawi has been described as having one of the richest lake fish faunas in the world, being the home for some 200 mammal, 650 bird, 30+ mollusc, and 5,500+ plant species.

The ecoregions include tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands of the miombo woodland, dominated by miombo trees; and the Zambezian and mopane woodlands, characterized by the mopane tree ; and also flooded grassland providing grassland and swamp vegetation.

There are five national parks, four wildlife and game reserves and two other protected areas in Malawi.

Source: Wikipedia

Get Featured on AYC’s Changemakers Corner

changemakers

The African Youth Corner is pleased to introduce the Changemakers’ Corner. Beginning in 2017, we shall be featuring young changemakers across Africa. The aim of this is to know the extent to which young people are driving change in their localities, to measure our progress and challenge other youth in Africa to rise up and take initiatives to better their communities. Your work may be related to Education, Health, Environment, Energy, Sustainable Development Goals, etc.

Eligibility

Open to young Africans and other young people who are not of African origin, but are driving change and resident in an African country.

Send a summary ofyourself and the work you are doing (in not less than 250 words) to africanyouthcorner@gmail.com

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African Leaders Over 70 Years

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The continent of Africa is ranked among the developing world and a major factor influencing this is the quality of leaders who are piloting affairs of African States. Development can be largely achieved with effective leadership and representation. Many Heads of State are senior citizens who ought to be by the sidelines giving counsel to the young leaders. Some of them have been the only leader the citizens have ever had and this has a way of affecting their general idea of leadership.

Below is a list of some aged Heads of State in Africa:

1. Robert Mugabe – Zimbabwe (Age: 92 years old)

2. Beji Caid Essebsi – Tunisia (Age: 89 years)

3. Paul Biya – Cameroun (Age: 83 years)

4. Abdelaziz Bouteflika – Algeria (Age: 79 years)

5. Manuel Pinto da Costa – São Tomé and Príncipe (Age: 79 years)

6. Alpha Condé – Guinea (Age: 78 years)

7. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf – Liberia (Age: 77 years)

8. Peter Mutharika – Malawi (Age: 75 years)

9. Jacob Zuma – South Africa (Age: 74 years)

10. Alassane Ouattara – Ivory Coast (Age: 74 years)

11. Muhammadu Buhari – Nigeria (Age: 73 years)

We wish to plead with our African leaders to please give the #YouthAChance to take the rein. Involving them early enough would guarantee rapid development and a sustainable future.

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African Youth Corner Launches the Leadership Shuttle

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The problem with most African communities has not been lack of resources but the lack of effective leadership. African leaders have done very little in developing and mentoring other young people to become accountable and dependable leader.

To ensure a sustainable future for a developing world like Africa, young people have to be trained on how to be effective and credible leaders. This September, the African Youth Corner launches her flagship program, the Leadership Shuttle. The program aims at equipping young people with the necessary knowledge they need to lead themselves and community. The program would bring several young leaders in the various communities and engage participants in order to prepare them, sharpen their leadership skills and enhance their capacities and quality of service when they lead in society.

Youth Up for the Environment

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The environment is important for the survival of mankind; therefore mankind must ensure the survival of the environment. The environment has the ability to sustain itself but the action of man keeps posing constant and continual threat to the environment. The use of machines resulting in the release of excess carbon to the atmosphere, production processes that leaves many pollutants, and indiscriminate waste disposal contribute to the environmental degradation.
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The African Youth Corner (AYC) collaborated with Standing for Environmental Restoration (SOFER) in carrying out an environmental sustainability project. The project which held in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria, saw members of both organisations working hand-in-hand to collect waste from traders at a neighborhood market and educating the traders and locals on how to properly package and dispose their waste. Adopting the method of recycling, reducing and reusing, the team broke into smaller groups and went on to collect waste materials in the different categories. The climax of the exercise was when the team took control of a popular dump site in front of the Cross River State University of Technology (CRUTECH). The dump site which had been filled to the brim was a sanctuary for flies and other vectors. The teams scrubbed up, wearing gloves and nose mask and took the pains of properly packaging the waste in bags before the  agency in charge of final disposal would come to take the waste away. Other highlight of the exercise included distribution of waste baskets to traders and shop owners in the area and further engaging the beneficiaries in discussions that were aimed at effecting behavioural changes.

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As the founder of the African Youth Corner, Jude Ogar says: “It is our collective responsibility to ensure a cleaner, safer and sustainable environment.”

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25 Facts You Never Knew About Africa

1. Gambia has only one university.

2. Equatorial Guinea is Africa’s only Spanish-speaking country.

3. South Africa is the most visited African country.

4. Nigeria has the richest Black people in Africa.

5. Samuel Eto’o is the highest paid Footballer of all time, he received about £350,000 weekly in Russia in 2011.

6. A person from Botswana is called a Motswana, the plural is Batswana.

7. A person from Lesotho is called a Mosotho.

8. A person from Niger is called a Nigerien. A person from Burkina Faso is called a Burkinabe.

9. Nigeria has won more football cups than England.

10. Zimbabwe’s President, Robert Gabriel Mugabe is the world’s most educated President with 7 degrees, two of them are Masters.

11. Al-Ahly of Egypt is the richest club in Africa.

12. Didier Drogba is Chelsea’s highest goal scorer in European competition.

13. Johannesburg, South Africa is the most visited city in Africa.

14. Zinedine Zidane wanted to play for Algeria, but the selector rejected him, saying they are already many players like him in the team.

15. President Jacob Zuma was once a referee in prison.

16. President Robert Mugabe was jailed for 11 years for fighting for freedom.

17. President Robert Mugabe is Africa’s oldest Head of State and the world’s second oldest Head of State. He was born 1924.

18. The Seychellois are the most educated Africans. Seychelles’ literacy rates (Adult: 92%, Youth: 99%) Zimbabwe is 2nd (Adult: 91.2%, Youth: 99%).

19. Rwanda is a better country for gender equality than England and USA.

20. Somalia got its first ATM on October 7, 2014.

21. South Africa has the most Grammy Award winners in Africa.

22. Ethiopia has the most airports in Africa.

23. Ethiopia’s economy is growing faster than China’s.

24. Eritrea’s President, Isaiah Afwerki is the least richest President in Africa.

25. Ethiopia is Africa’s oldest independent country.